Dear Santa…All I Want For Christmas Is A Fabulous Home In The South

December 16, 2015 | By | Comments (1)

Dear-Santa-Note

Dear Santa,

I know that I haven’t written in a while. My bad.

I’m sure you’re probably swamped getting ready for your big journey across the world delivering gifts, so I suspect I’m crimping your schedule, but I was hoping that I could ask you a really big favor?

I’m assuming I’ve built up a pretty hefty Christmas favor bank over the last few years since I haven’t asked for anything in a while, and I have definitely not been naughty. So what I’m looking for might be a tall order, but I was hoping that for Christmas you could give my hubby, our two pups, and myself a really fabulous historic home in the South.

We love the lines of classic Southern architecture so we’re thinking columns on the front porch would be great or a really long driveway lined with live oaks and Spanish moss (preferably over a century old). My husband’s birthday is this week also so if you could throw an updated kitchen and master bathroom into the back of the sleigh we’ll consider it a two-fer.

I’m not sure how good the wireless signal is up in the North Pole but if you can get online, here are some of our favorite Southern houses that would be perfect to gift wrap for Christmas.

Have a safe trip! We’ll put the freshly made eggnog out for you.

Sincerely,

Meggen

Fairfield Estate (c. 1768), Berryville, VA

Fairfield-Estate

Fairfield Estate speaks to the inner architectural steward in all of us. Since being built in 1768, this remarkable family compound has only been owned by three distinguished families. The current family has owned Fairfield since the 1830s, spanning seven generations. That’s a legacy any new owner should be proud to carry on.

Griffith Worthington House (c. 1776), Annapolis, MD

Griffith-Worthington-House

The regal Griffith Worthington House is the perfect downtown historic home at any time of year, but in particular during Christmas time in Maryland’s lively capital Annapolis. Modernized in all the right places, this Revolutionary War masterpiece is steps from the waterfront and restaurants, and is currently owned by one of Fox News’ most popular female anchors. Perhaps some of her good luck will rub off on the next buyer.

Temple Heights (1837), Columbus, MS

Temple-Heights

There’s just something classically Southern about the Doric columns and wrap-around porches—perfect to spend hot lazy afternoons people watching with a Mint Julep in hand—of Temple Heights and all of its Antebellum glory that speaks to us. If we get any more impulsive we might be living in Mississippi soon. Plus the price is a steal!

John Ravenel House (1840), Charleston, SC

John-Ravenel-House

Located in one of our favorite Southern cities and one of its most iconic historic mansions, the John Ravenel House radiates the requirement to entertain. Holiday parties and political fundraisers would just be the starting point, with any excuse to invite over family and friends to quickly follow (can you say college bowl games?). If these walls could talk I am sure that they would have plenty to say.

Airslie Plantation (1860), Keswick, VA

Airslie-Plantation

If there was an historic estate that exemplifies the grandeur of classic Virginia horse country architecture and the history of the South, Airslie Plantation would be it. This landmark property, which retains over 500 undeveloped acres, offers its next owner a rare yet tastefully modernized piece of Virginia history, with endless opportunities to enjoy the classic rod and gun aristocratic pastimes without ever having to touch your driveway.

For more visit: www.findeverythinghistoric.com

COMMENTS

  1. Laura

    Dear Santa – if gifting two southern historic homes is too much to ask for. I’ll take the guest wing in any of these gorgeous homes!
    Blessings, Laura

    December 17, 2015 at 9:01 am

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