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Early Airport Barbecue

The period between 1930 and 1960 saw a great flourishing of barbecue enterprises throughout the South, as one resourceful cook after another threw up a canvas tent or wooden stand and started selling slow-smoked meat wherever they saw potential customers. A few of these early restaurants stuck around and are still in business today (including the ones we profiled to celebrate Southern Living’s 50th […]

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Fresh Off the Pit

A round-up of barbecue news from across the South BBQ Sports Betting Heads North It’s now routine for governors in Southern states to engage in friendly barbecue wagers when the football or basketball teams from their respective states square off in a  championship game. (Though I’ve never quite understood how it’s much of a prize for a North Carolina politician to have to eat smoked brisket […]

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Wood or Gas? Maybe That’s the Wrong Question

  Texas Monthly’s Daniel Vaughn, whom I hold responsible for the pandemic-like spread of smoked brisket into previously-pure barbecue regions like the Carolinas, recently posted this picture on Instagram. The fully packed firebox on the Oyler at the Slow Bone. They load it at 2:00 and let it run until 6:00 the next morning. A photo posted by Daniel Vaughn […]

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Boudin: A Houston Barbecue Treat

I just got back from a quick trip to Houston, Texas, and I came away with a couple of observations. First, Houston is really, really big—and by big, I’m not talking about population (though with 2.2 million residents, it is the fourth largest city in the country.) Rather, I’m talking about geographic scale, for the city of Houston sprawls out […]

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A Wine + Food Festival and the Future of Charleston ‘Cue

For most of its 350-year history, Charleston, South Carolina, had no real barbecue tradition to speak of. It wasn’t until the decades just after World War II, when the Bessinger and Dukes families brought their mustard-based sauce and hash and rice down from Orangeburg County, that the city adopted what passed for a local style. Now, though, something new is in the works. In just […]

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What’s In a Name? 3 Tasty BBQ Treats

In the South some barbecue specialties have curious names, and those names can be downright confusing the first time you encounter them. There’s Texas Pete, for example. No, it’s not from Texas, and you’re not likely to find it served next to a pile of brisket on brown butcher paper. Instead, it’s a staple on the tables of barbecue joints […]

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Looking for Harper Lee

In the May 1997 issue of Southern Living, longtime Southern Living staffer and Monroeville, Alabama, native Mark Childress wrote this essay about a rare exchange with Harper Lee. According to Childress, “[To Kill a Mockingbird] moved me as no book had ever done. It made me want to learn how to make that kind of magic, to tell that kind […]

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Off The Beaten Path: A Half-Century of Barbecue

With this month’s print issue, Southern Living celebrates its Golden Anniversary, and I contributed a piece on barbecue joints that have been around 50 years or more—that is, places that were in business the day the first issue of Southern Living hit the newsstands. We had to trim the introduction a little for the print issue, so here’s the full version.  Much has changed in the world of […]

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Now Is The Perfect Time to Use Dry Conditioner—Here’s How to Do It

If you’re anything like us, you’re already well-versed in dry shampoo. But what about its sister styling product, dry conditioner? If you’ve never heard of it, you’re not alone: Though it’s popped up here and there before, only in the past few months have we noticed a true boom in the dry conditioner department. The timing is no coincidence, says […]

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The Mason-Dixonary: Dickens

Hearing a certain word can tell you quicker than a road map that you’ve crossed the Mason-Dixon Line. Some terms are particular to the South, while others are just embraced more fondly here. Check back each Wednesday for more words that give voice to the spirit and soul of our region.

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